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June 2019

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Odd Lots

  • I've posted a significant update of my Carl & Jerry page, with new material on John T. Frye, including the conclusion I've drawn (with help from 1910, 1920, and 1930 census records provided by Bob Ballantine W8SU) that Bailey Frye was not John Frye's brother. Bob also sent out a scan of W9EGV's QSL card, worked up against a 50s cover (not sure precisely what issue) of Boy's Life. New details from newspaper clippings sent me by Michael Holley flesh out the man a little. He was quite a guy. Do take a look.
  • Science is good at puncturing legends, and German researchers digging around in the former backyard of Martin Luther have deflated the legend that Luther was a humble monk (and, by implication, starving) but was instead born to an upper-class family and became a prosperous man who weighed 23 stone, 8 pounds (330 pounds for us Yanks) and ate goose, young piglet, several kinds of fish, and (egad) robins. Nor did he pound his 95 theses to the door of the Wittenburg cathedral in a fury with nails, as legend holds, but instead used drawing pins—what in America we call thumb tacks. Oh, the humanity...
  • While researching Marian apparitions for a seminar I'm teaching at our church in November, I ran across the Apparitions of Jesus and Mary Reference Chart. It sounds silly, but trust me: The apparition curve has gone exponential in the last 30 years, and you can't tell the Marys without a program anymore.
  • I'm in the Chicago area for a few days, and found on my arrival that the legendary Choo-Choo Restaurant in Des Plaines (just down the street and around the corner from our condo) is in danger of being razed to make room for a new police station. There's a Web site for gathering protest and forwarding it to the City of Des Plaines, which apparently can either raze the Choo-Choo or the defunct Masonic temple across the street. I don't quite understand why that's a hard decision.
  • Harry Helms sends word that TV Guide, which Rupert Murdoch bought ten years ago for three billion dollars, has been sold for...a buck. Boy, the magazine business is not what it used to be. (If it were, I'd still be in it.)
  • Slashdot reports a bit of useful black humor, in that Codeweavers (makers of the Crossover product line) gave the Bush administration a challenge: Reduce the cost of gasoline in the Twin Cities below $2.79 a gallon, and they would give away their products for an entire day. Well, courtesy the recent financial meltdown (which was not caused exclusively or perhaps even primarily by the Bush administration, by the way) gas has gone south of $2.79, and while the Codeweavers site has been Slashdotted into paralysis, there is a facility online whereby the firm will email you an unlock code for something. I've been meaning to try Crossover Linux for some time. Here's my chance, I guess. And gas in Colorado Springs is even cheaper than that. Inc(Boggle);

Comments

"I'm in the Chicago area for a few days, and found on my arrival that the legendary Choo-Choo Restaurant in Des Plaines (just down the street and around the corner from our condo) is in danger of being razed to make room for a new police station. There's a Web site for gathering protest and forwarding it to the City of Des Plaines, which apparently can either raze the Choo-Choo or the defunct Masonic temple across the street. I don't quite understand why that's a hard decision."

Simple.
The Choo Choo is on the same block as the municiple complex while the temple is across the busy street.
There is a good deal of utility in havng it all in the same place.
I'm not saying I like the idea, but I understand why the town finds it preferable.

GHR
I guess. But something like the Choo-Choo is a historical relic and probably won't come back if destroyed. Now, what would be very cool would be if the city built the station around the Choo-Choo, which is a smallish building at one edge of a fair bit of land. Odd, but I'm guessing there'd be enough space left for the police.
The common name "robin" represents a different species in Europe than in North America. I do not know anything about the edibility of either.

K.
Yes, the european robin is a much smaller bird - not much on it to eat and anyway, their song is far too attractive to want to kill them...
Eating songbirds was once a commonplace in Europe, and there are areas where certain birds are still hunted for food. I read somewhere that French officials still arrest bunting poachers from time to time, and the late President Mitterand was supposed to have eaten one at his final meal.

It was the smallest songbirds that were eaten most often, because (at least as I heard back in college) cooking them softened the bones to the point where the plucked and gutted bird could be eaten whole.

Cheap Gas?

Yes, recent falls (plus changes in dollar/pound exchange rate) means that I only (!) paid $5-35 per US gallon when I filled up at the weekend.

Fortunately, since I use my e-bike most of the time, that tankfull will likely last me until January, or more likely, end of February.

Take that, OPEC!

W9EGV in QST.

Hi Jeff. Searching the QST indexes, I see that Mr. Frye wrote a letter to the "Correspondence From Members" section of QST in Aug 1940. He also won a monthly article contest for a story titled "The Most Interesting Band" in Jan '41.

The Phone-Band Phunnies consisted of 14 articles during 1947-48. There are a couple other miscellaneous correspondence pieces by him in 1948 and 1954.

I have .PDFs of all this if you want it.

72/73,
Rich, N8UX
Huh.

As a lapsed Lutheran, I can tell you that I never thought of Luther as "humble".

Logically correct, perhaps, if one assumes from the get go that a literal reading of (edited) Scripture trumps tradition and common sense, but humble?

Only if you weren't paying attention.

(Anonymous)

Jeff,

The Masonic Temple is effectively next door to the Choo Choo, and it's not an either/or proposition, the development would take up both sites. Neither should go (nor should the Des Plaines Theater across the street) - all three either are big downtown attractions or potential ones, and it would be a big waste of resources to lose any of them.